Toronto Loft Conversions

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Not just lofts, we can also help you find that perfect house. From the latest architectural marvel to a piece of our Victorian past, the best and most creative spaces abound.

Condos in Toronto

I started off selling mainly condos, helping first time buyers get a foothold in the Toronto real estate market. Now working with investors and helping empty nesters find that perfect luxury suite.

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Toronto Real Estate

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iZone LoftsI-Zone Authentic Live-Work Loft! Huge Vintage Original Warehouse Space Intelligently Renovated With Massive Private Rooftop Terrace Directly Above The Suite. This Loft Has Been Redesigned And Beautifully Finished By The Building’s Original Developer – First Time Ever On The Market! Not Often Does An Opportunity Like This Present Itself. Vintage And Modern Packaged Together In One Amazing Space – Great For Entertaining Or Just Chilling. Rooftop Deck Creates Your Very Own Urban Backyard. MORE DETAILS HERE

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Eight Wellesley Lofts – 8 Wellesley Street

Natalie Jeffrey liked this post

Unfortunately, there just aren’t enough brick and beam lofts for sale at any one time in the Toronto loft market. There are always so many people looking and not enough listings. Keep an open mind and you will find a plethora of converted office buildings, many of them downtown. And one of the best examples – and one of the most downtownish of them all – is 8 Wellesley.

Eight Wellesley Lofts - 8 Wellesley Street

The lofts at 8 Wellesley as they look today

Buildings like this offer good alternatives. They have the open floor plans and the high ceilings. Large windows and concrete columns. And they tend to be in more central locations than a lot of the old factories and warehouses. Completed in 1997, this converted office building is one of downtown’s hidden gems. With huge suites and high ceilings, you would not believe the price per square foot.

Eight Wellesley Lofts - 8 Wellesley Street

Some of the Eight Wellesley owners have renovated luxuriously

I have dug and searched and asked around, but I cannot find out anything about the previous office building. I know it was reddish coloured and that is about it. The best I could do was to find it mid-conversion, sometime around 1995-1996.

Eight Wellesley Lofts - 8 Wellesley Street

The office building in the middle of its conversion to lofts in 1995-1996

Office or condo, it’s hard to imagine a more central or convenient downtown location than the eighty fine lofts at 8 Wellesley Street East! Prominently located in the heart of Toronto’s downtown core at the corner of Yonge and Wellesley, you’re just steps away from vibrant Yonge Street shopping, movie theatres, Yorkville, Yonge & Bloor – and tons of restaurants ranging from cheap and cheerful to elegant.

Eight Wellesley Lofts - 8 Wellesley Street

The lofts have flooring ranging from concrete to parquet to hardwood

Second floor units have massive terraces with 300-400 square feet of outdoor space overlooking Yonge Street. The roof garden has amazing views of the city and the location could not be better with the subway literally next door. Easily one of the best priced loft buildings in all of Toronto.

Eight Wellesley Lofts - 8 Wellesley Street

Colour abounds in many of the Eight Wellesley lofts

Eight Wellesley Lofts, a converted office building, may just be the home you are looking for! With massive suites and high ceilings, you will quickly forget that you are in the heart of Toronto. And as you grab some sun on the building’s rooftop garden, the trials and tribulations of city living will immediately be forgotten.

Eight Wellesley Lofts - 8 Wellesley Street

The penthouse lofts can be quite large at 8 Wellesley

The lofts at 8 Wellesley also offer some fantastic amenities for residents to enjoy. These include the landscaped rooftop patio with barbeques, gym overlooking the patio, saunas, spacious party room with 20 foot ceilings and dramatic views, plus a 24 hour concierge.

Eight Wellesley Lofts - 8 Wellesley Street

The rooftop terrace at 8 Wellesley is one of the best in the city

What started life as an office building (designed by Peter Caspari) sometime after the Yonge subway line was built in the 1950s, the building was stripped to its concrete shell in 1995-96 when it was converted to condominiums from office space. It was Dermot J. Sweeney Architects Ltd. who did the conversion to lofts, which involved stripping it right down to the concrete.

Eight Wellesley Lofts - 8 Wellesley Street

8 Wellesley as it looked before many of the new condos were built nearby

There is a very tiny underground parking lot with only 20 spaces. Getting your hands on one is not easy. But with this location and the Wellesley subway station next door, you really don’t need a car to live here. I am one of the few agents who have bought and sold multiple units here, so please get in touch if you have any questions.

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Contact Laurin Jeffrey for more information – 416-388-1960

Laurin Jeffrey is a Toronto real estate agent with Century 21 Regal Realty.
He did not write every article, some are reproduced here for people who
are interested in Toronto real estate. He does not work for any builders.

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Earl Court – 38 Earl Street

Natalie Jeffrey liked this post

Earl Court consists of ten new row houses, and three old rehabilitated houses, in a total of five distinct buildings. One row of new houses are set behind the street and accessed by an alleyway. But it is the heritage Victorian homes that really wow, they are some of the most striking Victorian rowhouses in Toronto. Close to Yonge & Bloor, the Church Street Village, Yorkville, you name it.

Earl Court - 38 Earl Street

The gorgeous Victorian architecture of the historic Bay and Gable homes of Earl Court

Units 3-6 and 13 are in the original homes, which were built in 1879 in classic Toronto “bay and gable” style by C. R. Rundle. Heritage Toronto says one house is designated heritage, but there are two plaques on site. Either way, the homes are deemed historically notable by the city. The originals are a detached house (numbers 5, 6 and 13) at the eastern end, with a semi (#3 & #4) directly to the west.

Earl Court - 38 Earl Street

You can see the houses on this old 1889 map of Toronto, showing the end of Earl Street, near Sherbourne

Then, to the west of the heritage homes, units 1 & 2 are in a newer semi, with the underground parking entrance below. Units 7-12 are in the newer row of townhomes behind the homes fronting onto Earl Street. The newer additions were built in 1982, by architect Peter F. Turner. He did an amazing job of giving them to right historic feel, they blend in with the originals very well.

Earl Court - 38 Earl Street

You almost cannot tell the new from the old at Earl Court

The exclusive enclave of towns has layouts with 1 bedroom, 2 bedrooms and 3 bedrooms, some with dens. They range in size from 1,250 square feet for the 1-beds, 1,800-2,300 square feet for the 2-beds and 2,250 up to a massive 2,600 square feet for the 3-bedroom units. All of the units have wood burning fireplaces, along with roof top decks or ground level patios.

Earl Court - 38 Earl Street

The towns of Earl Court really are luxurious

The renovated layouts offer efficient and spacious floor plans, with modern living areas and European kitchens with marble counter tops. Step up to bedrooms with cathedral ceilings and spa-like ensuites.

Earl Court - 38 Earl Street

Upper level bedrooms take advantage of the unique architecture

Earl Court provides easy access to Wellesley, Sherbourne & Yonge/Bloor subway stations. Shoot down Jarvis to the Gardiner, or across Bloor to the DVP. But if you like here, you can leave the car at home and walk to Bloor Street shopping or Yorkville Shops & Restaurants. The University of Toronto is around the corner and Ryerson University is only 3-4 blocks away. Nibblies are easy to find with FreshCo or Loblaws stores nearby.

Earl Court - 38 Earl Street

The city surrounds you with incomparable views from the roof top decks of Earl Court

The units have their own private underground parking and decent maintenance fees. And BBQs are allowed, great for summer grilling!

Expect prices in the mid-$500s for the smallest and into the $700s or more for the largest.

Earl Court - 38 Earl Street

Summer time is for BBQing and relaxing on the patios of Earl Court

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Contact Laurin Jeffrey for more information – 416-388-1960

Laurin Jeffrey is a Toronto real estate agent with Century 21 Regal Realty.
He did not write every article, some are reproduced here for people who
are interested in Toronto real estate. He does not work for any builders.

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Dominion Felt Works Lofts – 41 Shanly Street

Natalie Jeffrey liked this post

The red neon sign above the door draws your eye to the mother of all Toronto loft conversions – the Dominion Felt Works Lofts. This original hard loft conversion offers suites ranging in size from 800 to 1,800 square feet. The lofts feature exposed brick, 12- to 30-foot ceilings, atrium windows and skylights, as well as private garages.

Dominion Felt Works Lofts - 41 Shanly Street

From the street, the Dominion Felt Works Lofts is a rather unassuming building – but the new grey paint looks sharp!

Originally constructed as the factory for the Dominion Felt Company, this ugly industrial building was transformed in 1981-1982 into 10 two- and three-storey hard loft units. If you look closely at old pictures of the former felt factory, it appears to be snowing. Except that it is NOT snow… what appears to be snowflakes flying around is actually nasty particulate pollution from the felt manufacturing process.

Dominion Felt Works Lofts - 41 Shanly Street

A young-looking Christopher Hume reviews the Dominion Felt Works Lofts

To say that the neighbours were pleased with the conversion is an understatement. They had been complaining to the local councillor for years about the building, trying to get something done about the emissions.

Bob Mitchell and his Mitchell and Associates won the Ontario Renews Award in 1984 for this innovative conversion of a non-residential to a residential building. Even more noteworth, the Dominion Felt Works Lofts at 41 Shanly Street was the first legal residential loft project in the City of Toronto. This is the loft conversion project that started everything!

Dominion Felt Works Lofts - 41 Shanly Street

Large open spaces, multiple levels, fireplaces – all the good stuff in the Dominion Felt Works Lofts

If nothing else, 41 Shanly Street is an example of how even the most modest industrial building can find new meaning and live happily ever after as a place for people to live. The old factory was a nondescript structure just west of Dovercourt Road in the heart of a stable neighbourhood. In the early 1980s, it was converted into lofts, which remain today.

Though stucco isn’t as trendy as it was 20 years ago, at 41 Shanly it seems to have withstood the vicissitudes of time and weather change in reasonable style. That’s not to say it’s especially attractive, but it fits into the neighbourhood so well it’s almost invisible. Even after more than three decades, the complex is strangely unfinished – above all on the east side, where the neighbours park their cars and a gravel path leads to a row of front doors. On the west side, where garage doors dominate, the complex looks more like a storage facility than a human habitation.

But given how innovative the scheme was – and is – it deserves our respect.

Dominion Felt Works Lofts - 41 Shanly Street

Unfortunately, a lot of the brick has been painted over in the Dominion Felt Works Lofts

Call it Bloorcourt or Dovercourt Village, 41 Shanly Street is located in the west end of Toronto. The old factory at 41 Shanly Street was a felt manufacturing industrial building. The homes of its workers – and those working in other factories in the area – grew up around the factory, leaving it embedded in a residential neighbourhood. Which did not sit well with the nearby residents. In the early 1980s, along came Bob Mitchell, who bought the building, converting and extending it into 10 multi-level lofts – something Toronto had never seen before. Mitchell made sure the loft had all the creature comforts, from indoor parking to private roof terraces and fireplaces, included as standard.

Dominion Felt Works Lofts - 41 Shanly Street

Large private roof top terraces provide amazing outdoor space under the trees

Shanly Street was originally called Durham Street, but the name was changed sometime between 1884 and 1890, for reasons I cannot determine. I am also not too sure when the building was built, there doesn’t seem to be any record of it. I do know that the felt factory was not on 1924 Goad’s fire map, thus it was built at some point after that. But that is as much as I can find. There is still a Dominion Felt Company in Toronto, in North York. I wonder if it is the same company… I should call them and see what I can find out!

Dominion Felt Works Lofts - 41 Shanly Street

Personally, I love the neon 41 Shanly sign at the Dominion Felt Works Lofts

Depending who you talk to, neighbourhood surrounding the Dominion Felt Works Lofts goes by many names: Dovercourt Village, Dovercourt Park, Bloorcourt… On MLS it is known as Dovercourt-Wallace Emerson, but that encompasses a much larger area. There is a lovely Dovercourt Park at the centre of this ’hood north of Bloor, south of Dupont and loosely between Dufferin and Ossington – depending on who’s sketching the boundaries.

Dominion Felt Works Lofts - 41 Shanly Street

Huge bedrooms walk out to the huge terraces at the Dominion Felt Works Lofts

The Village of Dovercourt was founded in the 1870s by poor immigrants from England. They moved into the area, living in dozens of one- and two-bedroom tar-paper shacks which made the initial village look more like a shantytown. The name Dovercourt comes from the name of the home of the Denison estate, Dover Court, located west of Dundas and Ossington. The village was annexed by the old City of Toronto in 1912, helping stimulate its growth and development by 1923.

As gentrification continues its bold march west, first-time buyers eager to find a home near the subway line have been snapping up houses in this up-and-coming area. A lot of the residences in the northwest corner of the area were originally constructed for workers employed in the factories that once lined the railway. Development proposal signs dot formerly industrial lands and some old factories have been converted into lofts like the Dominion Felt Works Lofts. The western border is still a little dodgy, but house prices in the east are now high enough to nearly close the gap with neighbouring Seaton Village.

Eds Real Scoop

I scream, you scream, we all scream for Ed’s Real Scoop

New art galleries, bars, vintage stores and indie coffee shops have followed, sparking rumours that the Bloor strip between Lansdowne and Dufferin is the second coming of West Queen West. The Rustic Owl is a new spot for coffee and treats with friendly people behind the counter and a gallery in the back. People rave about the ice cream sandwiches at Bakerbots, where they bake their own cookies and fill them with delectable flavours from Ed’s Real Scoop. John’s El Cafecito appears to be a virtual office for many of its regulars. They also sell artisanal crafts. Drift is the place for hangover poutine around noon and then booze and board games in the evening. Freedom Clothing Collective is a favourite boutique in the neighbourhood for anyone who needs an original gift or has a bit of spare time to peruse the garments and jewelry from local designers. Finally, check out the Hollow Ground Barber Shop, where a young crew takes advantage of a retro building and fittings to open an old-school barber shop.

Hollow Ground Barber Shop

The Hollow Ground Barber Shop on Bloor Street West

It’s an easy stroll along the side streets to the Bloor subway line, and the Dufferin bus route also runs right along the west border.

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Contact Laurin Jeffrey for more information – 416-388-1960

Laurin Jeffrey is a Toronto real estate agent with Century 21 Regal Realty.
He did not write every article, some are reproduced here for people who
are interested in Toronto real estate. He does not work for any builders.

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